scientist-in-lab
Health News

Scientists Test New Painkiller: Like Morphine, But Without the Addiction

Morphine

Morphine

Scientists are testing a new painkiller that is as strong as morphine but isn’t likely to be addictive and with fewer side effects.

Using rats, scientists compared several engineered variants of the neurochemical endomorphin, which is found naturally in the body, to morphine to measure their effectiveness and side effects. The peptide-based drugs target the same pain-relieving opioid receptor as morphine.

Opium-based drugs are the leading treatments for severe and chronic pain, but they can be highly addictive. Their abuse results in thousands of overdose deaths in the United States annually. They can cause motor impairment and potentially fatal respiratory depression. Patients also build up tolerance over time, increasing the risk for abuse and overdose.

Read more 0 Comments
pregnanat-women
Pregnancy

One Hospital in This City Gave Vulnerable Women an Option. Now It’s Gone.

Greater Cincinnati Hospital

Greater Cincinnati Hospitals

If a pregnant woman in the Greater Cincinnati area receives the diagnosis of a fetal abnormality such as Tay-Sachs disease or anencephaly—in which a major part of the fetus’ brain does not develop—she is no longer able to terminate the pregnancy in a local hospital.

The Christ Hospital in Mount Auburn was the last hospital in the city of more than 2 million to provide this service, but two months ago it enacted a new policy that prohibits physicians from performing abortions in fetal anomaly cases. The hospital will now only terminate pregnancies “in situations deemed to be a threat to the life of the mother,” the new policy reads.

Read more 0 Comments
zika-virus-wording
Health News

Zika has been sexually transmitted in Texas, CDC confirms

Zika Virus Study

Zika Virus Study

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Wednesday updated its Zika virus guidance for pregnant women, advising them to protect themselves if their male sexual partner has traveled to or lives in an area where Zika virus is circulating.

“Until we know more, if your male sexual partner has traveled to or lives in an area with active Zika virus transmission, you should abstain from sex or use condoms the right way every time you have vaginal, anal, and oral sex for the duration of the pregnancy,” the updated guidance says.

Read more 0 Comments
chipotle-mexican-restaureant
Diseases and Conditions

Chipotle Norovirus Illness Outbreak

Food Poisoning

Food Poisoning

What is a Norovirus?

Norovirus is a very contagious virus also known as stomach flu or food poison. You can get norovirus from an infected person, contaminated food or water, or by touching contaminated surfaces. The virus causes your stomach or intestines or both to get inflamed (acute gastroenteritis). This leads you to have stomach pain, nausea, and diarrhea and to throw up. Anyone can be infected with norovirus and get sick. Also, you can have norovirus illness many times in your life. Norovirus illness can be serious, especially for young children and older adults. Norovirus is the most common cause of acute gastroenteritis in the United States. Each year, it causes 19-21 million illnesses and contributes to 56,000-71,000 hospitalizations and 570-800 deaths. Norovirus is also the most common cause of foodborne-disease outbreaks in the United States.

Read more 0 Comments
football-collar
Head and Neck

New ‘Collar’ Aims to Help Shield Brain From Concussion

Concussions at Football Games

Concussions at Football Games

FRIDAY, Nov. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) — A new type of lightweight, pressurized neck collar may help prevent mild concussions during sports, according to the developers of the device.

The collar, which weighs four to five ounces — is designed to exert a minimal amount of continual pressure on the large neck veins that carry blood from the heart to the head, and back again.

That slight pressure, which is similar to the pressure of a tie knot, triggers a slight drop in the amount of blood that flows out of the head. That leaves a little extra fluid in the brain, which helps cushion it in case of impact, the researchers said.

Read more 0 Comments
adhd-medication-bullies
Children's Health

Kids Who Take ADHD Meds More Likely to Be Bullied, Study Finds

bulling

Bullying

FRIDAY, Nov. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) — Teenagers who take drugs like Adderall and Ritalin to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are twice as likely to be bullied as their peers who don’t have ADHD, a new study suggests.

The risk of being bullied is even greater if the teens sell, trade or give away their medicines, researchers found.

However, the research also raises questions about why these kids are targets of frequent taunting or aggression by their peers.

Is it teens’ access to drugs that eggs on bullies, or something else?

Read more 0 Comments
nasal-spray
Health News

FDA Approves Nasal Spray to Reverse Narcotic Painkiller Overdose

painkiller-overdoseTHURSDAY, Nov. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) — A nasal spray that treats narcotic painkiller and heroin drug overdoses has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

The newly approved nasal spray (Narcan) contains the medication naloxone hydrochloride, which can stop or reverse the effects of a narcotic (also called opioid) drug overdose. Narcan is the first approved nasal spray version of the medication and offers an important new easy-to-use treatment option for family members and first responders dealing with a heroin or narcotic painkiller overdose, the FDA said.

Read more 0 Comments
Pamela-Anderson-hepatitis-c
Health News

Pamela Anderson Announces She’s Cured of Hepatitis C: What Is the Disease?

Male liver anatomy with digestive organs

Hepatitis Liver C

People reported earlier this summer that Anderson had started a new drug regimen approved by the Food and Drug Administration that would eradicate the virus. “I don’t have any liver damage and I don’t have any side effects,“ she told People earlier this year. “I’m living my life the way I want to but it could have eventually have caused me some problems and so it was a real blessing that I was able to get the medicine. I’m half way there.”

Read more 0 Comments
organ-for-transplant
Health News

Wealth May Give Advantage for Getting Organ Transplants

Organ Transplant Surgery

Organ Transplant Surgery

You can’t buy hearts, kidneys or other organs but money can still help you get one. Wealthy people are more likely to get on multiple waiting lists and score a transplant, and less likely to die while waiting for one, a new study finds.

The work confirms what many have long suspected — the rich have advantages even in a system designed to steer organs to the sickest patients and those who have waited longest. Wealthier people can better afford the tests and travel to get on more than one transplant center’s waiting list, and the new study shows how much this pays off.

Read more 0 Comments
man-drinking-sweetened-drink
Mens Health

Sweetened Drinks Might Raise Men’s Risk for Heart Failure

Sweetened Drinks

Sweetened Drinks

MONDAY, Nov. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) — People who regularly consume sodas or sweetened fruit drinks may have a higher risk for heart failure, researchers report.

In the study, Swedish men who drank two or more servings of sweetened beverages a day had a 23 percent higher risk of suffering heart failure, said lead author Susanna Larsson, an associate professor of epidemiology at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm.

“People who regularly consume sweetened beverages should consider reducing their consumption to lower their risk of heart failure as well as obesity and type 2 diabetes and possibly other diseases,” Larsson said.

Read more 0 Comments